US government shutdown enters 22nd day — the longest federal closure in country’s history

Trump has long avoided using the Oval Office as a backdrop for his speeches, telling aides that previous presidents looked stilted and “flat” in the standard, straight-ahead camera angle. But he was persuaded that the seriousness of the moment warranted the Oval Office for his speech to the nation this week about the fight over the border wall.

But since Tuesday night’s address, Trump has complained that he looked lifeless and boring, according to a Republican close to the White House who was not authorized to speak publicly about private conversations. The president also expressed misgivings about his visit to the border, believing it would do little to change anyone’s mind.

In a Friday morning tweet, Trump called illegal immigration on the southern border “an invasion,” even though border crossings have declined in recent years. Later, he tried to blame Democrats for the shutdown, claiming he’s flexible about the needed barrier.

“I don’t care what they name it,” Trump said. “They can name it ‘peaches.”‘

Trump has told advisors he believes the fight for the wall — even if it never yields the requested funding — is a political win for him.

But some of his outside advisors have urged him to declare a national emergency, believing it would have two benefits: First, it would allow him to claim that he was the one to act to reopen the government. Second, inevitable legal challenges would send the matter to court, allowing Trump to continue the fight for the wall — and continue to excite his supporters — while not actually closing the government or immediately requiring him to start construction.

Such a move could put Republicans in a bind. While it might end the standoff over funding and allow Congress to move onto other priorities, some Republicans believe such a declaration would usurp congressional power and could lead future Democratic presidents to make similar moves to advance liberal priorities.

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., a leader of the conservative House Freedom Caucus who speaks to Trump frequently, said that unless Republicans and Democrats strike an unlikely compromise, “I fully expect him to declare a national emergency.”

“Most conservatives want it to be the last resort he would use,” Meadows said. “But those same conservatives, I’m sure if it’s deployed, would embrace him as having done all he could do to negotiate with Democrats.”

In a sign of growing unease, five GOP senators backed a bill from Sen. Susan Collins of Maine and Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin to resume paychecks for some 420,000 federal employees who are now working without pay during the shutdown.

Many Democrats, meanwhile, say they have little reason to give into Trump’s demand for border wall funding since taking control of the House in the midterm elections.

“The American people gave us the majority based on our comprehensive approach to this problem and they rejected President Trump’s,” said Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla.

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